Direct Hire… 2 tips!

When organisations hire directly from the market (and at times they should) I have two little tips to share that are easily forgotten.

1. Sell your company, your vision, your job, your values, your people etc. You may love your company but don’t assume an applicant will yet. Don’t assume anything. They don’t know enough to love you yet and they are interviewing you as much as you them. You have to move from interviewer to sales person as this is what recruiters do for you.

2. Manage the experience well. This means provide a good job brief and de-brief the applicant post interview regardless of desire to hire or not. This stage is about your brand and your reputation.

Sadly a very good client of ours has just lost a couple of great people because these items were over-looked. These are things recruiters do for you when engaged but when you do it yourself they are equally important!

I hope this helps…

Stripping it bare! Niche specialisation is the key.

As recruiters sometimes our proposition gets confused. When we present to potential clients it’s very tempting to rant on about great applicant tracking systems, robust assessment processes, social media expertise, great brand campaigns, or whatever. But really, when we cut through all the clutter, the thing we do that we are needed for is to target,  source and manage the right candidate. Yep we now use a whole lot of tools that were not always available but actually any good corporate recruiter and agency can do deploy these tools.

The thing they need us for is the experience and specialist knowledge of our sector. When combined with the skills to search out , engage and manage the process to successful outcomes our relevance never fades and our value is high.

Certainly I acknowledge that in-house recruitment teams and RPO providers can add great value to organisations in terms of volume hires but when the hard to find key people are needed we remain the best source. This is because if we are any good, we know where they are, what they want and we can go out and get to them.

A simple proposition but a complex role, hence there are many more $250k billers and much fewer $1,000,000 billers in our industry.

Be a niche specialist and great relationship manager if you want to stay high up in the value chain. You will always be relevant!

Performance Expectations must be higher!

Winston Churchill in Downing Street giving his...

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Raise the expectation on your recruitment teams and raise the expectation on your clients. 

Both these tactics lead to better quality and better billing! Both these tactics are the right manuevers as demand overtakes supply in our markets.

The next 12-18 months is not the time for conservative leadership. All our conversations should be aimed at high expectations and outcomes both internally and externally. I don’t mean blind faith, I mean clearly defined, focussed goals that commit all parties to great outcomes.

I’ve been watching the rise and rise of one team in particular in our group, Momentum Auckland, and how their individual and collective results keep soaring. They have a high level of retained assignments illustrating committed clients and they have a large number of very high performing consultants illustrating competent goal driven recruiters.

This team is operating in a market that got smashed in the midst of the GFC yet high expectations are being set and met!

Good on you lot… I think a great example for all of us leading recruitment teams!

And here is a very cool statistic … the job order book has gone from 5% to 52% exclusive retained over 18 months… I just wish I could claim it!

Braindrain!

Two threads of information I’ve noted from Twitter over the last week cause some concern for employers in NZ.

1. 60,000 new jobs to be created in the mining sector in Australia over the next few years.
2. 35% of ICT professionals have indicated a desire to move offshore for work over the next couple of years.

Both items paint a picture of an increase in our already significant braindrain trend.

Do we have any news of anything that may lead to a reversal of this trend?